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Raymond museum adds beautiful Mitchell wagon
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
Raymond museum adds beautiful Mitchell wagon

RAYMOND — The Northwest Carriage Museum in Raymond has announced the arrival of a 1892 Mitchell Farm Wagon. The Mitchell is in original condition, including paint, pin striping and seller logo. The museum is the third owner of this historic...

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‘This Nest of Dangers’: 
Astorian speaks up, boosters for maritime economy
‘This Nest of Dangers’: Astorian speaks up, boosters for maritime economy

From its inauguration, Astoria’s first newspaper, the Tri-Weekly Astorian, itemized the ship traffic coming and going in the Columbia. In August 1873, it reported:

“Movement of Vessels. … On the way to this...

Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum presents ‘Flashback: Remembering the 60s’
Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum presents ‘Flashback: Remembering the 60s’
CPHM Remembering the 60s
This Nest of Dangers: 
Help!
This Nest of Dangers: Help!

New York-born Joel W. Munson came west in 1853, first to Portland where he got work as a carpenter helping to build a lumber mill down the Columbia River. He next moved to Astoria for several years, where he built houses, and then fetched up in...

This Nest of Dangers: 
Pilotless, the Desdemona sails into legend
This Nest of Dangers: Pilotless, the Desdemona sails into legend

Three-quarters of the way through the 1850s, the entrance and exit of the noted entrance to the West’s great river was assisted by bar pilots, buoys, and a lighthouse. Three months after Cape Disappointment light was lit, in the dark of the...

Razor clam phenomenon explained by September lecture
Razor clam phenomenon explained by September lecture
Museum - Clam Digging Exhibit
‘This Nest of Dangers’: A Columbia lighthouse … but what about a lens?
‘This Nest of Dangers’: A Columbia lighthouse … but what about a lens?

Journalists who traveled out west wrote stories that found their way to newspapers back home. One piece in The New York Tribune of August 1855 featured observations about our part of the world:

“…Astoria, where I write, has not...

Pacific Northwest eclipses illuminate solar system’s mysteries
Pacific Northwest eclipses illuminate solar system’s mysteries

After sunrise on July 18, 1860, the sky west of the mouth of the Columbia turned back to night, as if a cavern was opening between this and a darker world. Soon, all around, there was an “unearthy ghastly glow.”

The 498 whites in...

Web-exclusive: Editor shares second bunch of rare salmon label images
Web-exclusive: Editor shares second bunch of rare salmon label images

LONG BEACH — There once were dozens of salmon canneries from Hammond to Clifton and Ilwaco to Eagle Cliff. They were key to the Columbia estuary’s early economy and settlement.

Often the only tangible things that remain are the can...

Web-only feature: Salmon labels highlight key aspects of local history
Web-only feature: Salmon labels highlight key aspects of local history

LONG BEACH — There once were dozens of salmon canneries from Hammond to Clifton and Ilwaco to Eagle Cliff. They were key to the Columbia estuary’s early economy and settlement.

Often the only tangible things that remain are the can...

This Nest of Dangers: All hell breaks loose
This Nest of Dangers: All hell breaks loose

About the time Congress was reading Lt. Howison’s recommendations of 1848 — those calling for a lighthouse, lighted and unlighted buoys, bar pilots, and a steam towing tug (read: non-wind-powered vessel) to ease the chaos at the Columbia...

Peninsula pioneer gets his due
Peninsula pioneer gets his due
Jonathan Stout Story by Joan Mann
‘This Nest of Dangers’: Filling in the blanks
‘This Nest of Dangers’: Filling in the blanks
Early mapmakers unveiled the mysterious Northwest coast
‘This Nest of Dangers’
‘This Nest of Dangers’
Pioneer journalism still serves West Coast historians
Writer’s Notebook: Local innocence collided with World War I’s harsh realities
Writer’s Notebook: Local innocence collided with World War I’s harsh realities

When the U.S. entered World War I a century ago this month, local news was dominated by — what else? — the spring salmon season.

One of the many fascinations of running a newspaper is the easy ability to travel in time by diving...

‘This Nest of Dangers’: Two for the show
‘This Nest of Dangers’: Two for the show
Why Peacock Spit is named Peacock Spit
Cape Despair?
Cape Despair?
Rare visit offers seldom-seen details of historic lighthouse’s interior
This Nest of Dangers: Columbia fur trading came at a steep cost
This Nest of Dangers: Columbia fur trading came at a steep cost

The American fur-trading experiment known as Fort Astoria had a brief life. One expression of the War of 1812 between the U.S. and Great Britain was Canada’s North West Company buying out the assets of the Astor’s Pacific Fur Co. in...

No gusher: 
Ever-optimistic oilmen hit dry holes here
No gusher: Ever-optimistic oilmen hit dry holes here

Petroleum geology is anything but straightforward. The earth is so ancient — and has so often flopped over on itself, weathered down, thrust up, broken apart, erupted — that finding where petroleum is trapped can seem like a three-way...

This Nest of Dangers: Crossing the bar, ‘alarmed and frightened’
This Nest of Dangers: Crossing the bar, ‘alarmed and frightened’
Columbia’s entrance establishes reputation for astounding violence
Celebrate the pragmatic elegance of gasoline marine engines
Celebrate the pragmatic elegance of gasoline marine engines

Gasoline marine engines revolutionized working life on the Columbia River estuary the way cotton gins did in the South, but they don’t get much respect.

In the course of a half a tide, the river can go from mirror-like lake to something...

This Nest of Dangers: 
Beeswax on a lee shore: One of our enduring mysteries
This Nest of Dangers: Beeswax on a lee shore: One of our enduring mysteries

One of the joys of living at the beach is seeing what the tide brings in. Along the shore south of the mouth of the Columbia, in centuries past, in big chunks or small, it was what seemed like beeswax.

The South Bend [WA] Journal of the late...

North Head Lighthouse repairs continue
North Head Lighthouse repairs continue

CAPE DISAPPOINTMENT — Exterior renovations continue as weather permits this winter at North Head Lighthouse in Cape Disappointment State Park.

The lighthouse, which has been fenced off from public access, was completed in 1898. Although...

Writer’s Notebook: 
Tragic legacy of Plains Indian Wars still haunts the West
Writer’s Notebook: Tragic legacy of Plains Indian Wars still haunts the West

Like hungry little mountain bluebirds on the first day of grasshopper season, we were jumping with joyous energy as our teacher soothed us into our seats. It was a day to cherish: Our “graduation” from third grade, marking a successful...

This Nest of Dangers: Enormous Columbia plays hide and seek
This Nest of Dangers: Enormous Columbia plays hide and seek

The Columbia River rises in Canada’s Rocky Mountains, flows north, then south, west, south again, east, south, east again, south again, west, north, and finally west into the earth’s largest ocean. It gathers water from approximately the...

This Nest of Dangers: Pitiless perils prowl off Pacific Northwest coast
This Nest of Dangers: Pitiless perils prowl off Pacific Northwest coast

In the winter of 1978-79 when I was new to the Long Beach Peninsula, friends told me how wild our weather could be and how rough the Columbia River sometimes was; how in winter the Washington state highway department sometimes parked a road-grader...

This Nest of Dangers: 
Survivor of the Columbia bar, Wavertree gloriously restored in New York City
This Nest of Dangers: Survivor of the Columbia bar, Wavertree gloriously restored in New York City

Shipwrecks fascinate some of us; the Columbia River bar is famous for them. Decades ago I couldn’t quite believe it when I first saw the classic photograph of the Colonel de Villebois Mareuil crossing the bar under tow, mostly obscured by a...

Lewis and Clark: Pinpointing unknown campsites in Pacific County
Lewis and Clark: Pinpointing unknown campsites in Pacific County
Nation’s most famous explorers reached their Pacific Ocean destination in what is now Pacific County, but historians are still working out some important details about exactly where they camped each day

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