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Warm, wet days ahead

Wednesday’s temps could set a record; flooding possible

Observer staff report

Published on November 21, 2017 5:19PM

A warm atmospheric river carrying ample moisture from the tropics started splashing into the Pacific Northwest Tuesday, with plenty of rain ahead through at least Thanksgiving Day. Blue and white colors indicate the wettest parts of the weather system.

University of Washington

A warm atmospheric river carrying ample moisture from the tropics started splashing into the Pacific Northwest Tuesday, with plenty of rain ahead through at least Thanksgiving Day. Blue and white colors indicate the wettest parts of the weather system.

Black and red colors over Pacific County indicate rainfall totals in the range of 2.56 to 10.24 inches in the 72 hours ending at 4 p.m. Thursday. The actual total at lower elevations is likely to be 3 to 5 inches.

University of Washington

Black and red colors over Pacific County indicate rainfall totals in the range of 2.56 to 10.24 inches in the 72 hours ending at 4 p.m. Thursday. The actual total at lower elevations is likely to be 3 to 5 inches.


LONG BEACH — Sun lovers will have little to be thankful for this week, as an atmospheric river blasts into the Pacific Northwest coast bringing ample rain, gray skies and possibly record-warm temperatures.

“After some relatively cool spells in October and early November, Washington’s weather will be headed in the opposite direction as we approach the Thanksgiving holiday,” Washington State University meteorologist Nic Loyd said. “Wednesday and Thursday could be quite mild, as 60s are possible for highs in certain areas, and 40s or even low 50s are possible for low temperatures.”

This Tuesday, University of Washington weatherman Cliff Mass said, “The next 48 hours will be stunning in a number of ways: very heavy precipitation in the mountains, river flooding, and temperatures that will reach record levels.” Mass said there is “an amazing plume of water vapor heading directly from the tropics. It has our name on it.”

Flooding is a possibility, both due to heavy rain and the freezing level rising above 10,000 feet — likely to melt snow in the Olympics and Cascades. In Southwest Washington, flood-prone Grays River near Rosburg rose above its banks this Monday and could again before the week is over. The National Weather Service in Portland predicts rain — heavy at times — through Thanksgiving Day, switching over to showers Thursday night and Friday.

The week’s high on the Long Beach Peninsula will be 60 degrees Wednesday, according to the weather service. But Mass said warmth will be “amazing” in parts of Western Washington, probably breaking Seattle’s daily record Wednesday with a high in the lower 60s.

Mass noted that this week is typically the wettest of the year, according to historical records for our region.



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