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According to scientists the most abundant bird on our continent is also one of the most successful of the bird species that have been introduced in North America. Adaptability is the key to th…

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A striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) washed ashore just north of Ocean Park on Thursday evening, April 11. Personnel from Seaside Aquarium responded to the scene and found it was deceased…

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ILWACO — The Pacific Northwest tall ships Lady Washington and Hawaiian Chieftain will be making a return visit to Ilwaco from May 7 through 15. While in town, the vessels will be docked at Por…

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WILLAPA BAY — The term “living fossil” is one that mixes a sense of being out of place with one of awe and mystery. The coelacanth, a fish that lived alongside dinosaurs, was believed extinct …

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Who is plump with a small head and a thin straight bill with a gray back, two black wing bars and a blue-gray head? It is also stubby in appearance, has short legs and is just a touch smaller …

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Lately, the Tarlatt Slough area of the South Bay Unit of the Willapa National Wildlife Refuge has been on my mind. Why, you might ask? Well, in the last few years exciting bird activity has be…

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Anna’s hummingbirds stay with us throughout the winter. It is a permanent resident so it is also here in the other seasons of the year. The rufous hummingbird, on the other hand, is rarely see…

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As spring approaches my mind begins to turn to migration with great anticipation. It happens every year for me. However, it isn’t quite spring migration time yet, so I am concentrating on watc…

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Some birds are downright cute! Black-capped chickadees, Anna’s hummingbirds, and dark-eyed juncos seem to me to be cute! The fluffing out of their feathers on cold days give them a little butt…

breaking
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COLUMBIA RIVER — More than 1 million adult coho salmon are expected along the Oregon coast and Columbia River in 2019. Some 905,600 of those are forecast to enter the Columbia, where they are …

spotlight
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The woods can be pretty messy, with all of those leaves, branches, twigs and logs falling over and cluttering up the forest floor, making it hard to walk around.

spotlight
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With sunny skies and temperatures in the 50s, spring 2019 is gaining momentum this January on the south Washington coast. Evergreen blackberries, crocuses, early daffodils, some rhodies and pl…

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Lately, on my travels up and down the Peninsula, I see killdeer everywhere. They seem to have taken up residence in the short-grass fields, on mudflats when the tide is out, on roadsides, on t…

featured
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During the annual Christmas Bird count in December 2018, my friend Susan and I were lucky enough to be able to drive the beach and count the different species as well as the number of individu…

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OLYMPIA — The Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission voted last week in support of fishery managers’ plans to consider the dietary needs of endangered orcas when they set this year’s salmon-f…

featured
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SEAVIEW — If you drift at the whims of the sea, sometimes things aren’t going to work out so well. Large numbers of jellyfish have been paying the price in recent weeks.

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January surf has driven large numbers of moon jellyfish onto local beaches.

featured
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Since at least Nov. 15, 2018, a lone snow goose has been keeping company with a small flock of about 21 greater white-fronted geese. They seem to have chosen our area for their winter place of…

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If you have ever had the urge to contribute to science, a total lunar eclipse offers a great opportunity.

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This has been the first year I have been able to witness the phenomenon known as “king tides” and the possible effects on the birds. King tides are higher than our average high tides. Accordin…

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OLYMPIA — The Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission is offering two free days in January, when visitors to state parks will not need a Discover Pass for day-use visits.

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Downy woodpeckers love suet because it is especially energizing during our colder winter months. Other birds, such as house sparrows also love it and they tend to hog suet feeders and aggressi…

featured
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Yesterday while making a beach run for shorebirds, a surprise turned up. It was perched on one of the eagle perches in the dunes. It was very small, but looked interesting. Closer inspection w…