Kayaker rescued

An MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew from Coast Guard Sector Columbia River hovers over a capsized kayaker as they conduct a rescue near Ocean Shores on May 10. The rescued kayaker was treated for symptoms related to hypothermia.

A Coast Guard aircrew rescued a kayaker who capsized near the Grays Harbor entrance Sunday afternoon near Ocean Shores.

An MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew from Coast Guard Sector Columbia River hoisted the kayaker and transported him to the helicopter pad at Coast Guard Station Grays Harbor, where he was checked out by emergency medical services. He was treated for symptoms related to hypothermia and released, according to a Coast Guard statement.

Watchstanders at Sector Columbia River received a call from Pacific County Dispatch at 2:10 p.m. requesting assistance in rescuing a reported capsized kayaker near the entrance to Grays Harbor. The helicopter crew was diverted from training, and 47-foot Motor Life Boat crew from Station Grays Harbor was launched. Due to foggy conditions the visibility was only 200 yards offshore.

The kayaker was spotted by searchers at 2:45 p.m., and a rescue swimmer was lowered down to pull the man from the water at 2:53 p.m.

The tide was on the flood cycle, and the man was floating in about 15 feet of water at the time of the rescue between Damon Point and Ocean Shores.

The man was dropped off to EMS at 3:10 p.m. The Coast Guard boat crew recovered the kayak.

Conditions on the bar were 2- to 4-foot swells and water temperature was 56 degrees Fahrenheit.

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