NASELLE and DEEP RIVER — Several associated events are scheduled to occur during the day on Sunday, Dec. 2. A Christmas concert will take place in the Finnish Pioneer Church in Deep River, a tour will feature three local area homes and the annual soup supper will take place in the Naselle Lutheran Church.

This year, the Christmas Concert features songs by well-known singer and songwriter Carl Wirkkala. A resident of Castle Rock, Wirkkala is best recognized for his songs of the Northwest and as the lead singer in a Western band. Displaying another side of his vocal talent, Wirkkala will be performing songs in concert with the church setting.

Also featured will be the much-loved Naselle Children’s Choir performing under the direction of Becky Underhill. The choir performance is always a big hit and the rapport Underhill has with the children is wonderfully apparent bringing out their very best in song and motion.

Rounding out the musical performances will be Jan Wolf and the Bell Choir as they ring in Christmas music highlighting the start of the Christmas season.

Sue Holway, an Oysterville-based historian, will provide a history of the Pioneer Church that was constructed in 1898. Much effort has been expended over the years to maintain the original integrity of the structure including its original interior paint. Due to its position on the river with access to the Columbia, Deep River was once a center of social and religious activity and parishioners walked miles each Sunday to attend service at the Church.

The concert is scheduled to begin at 1:30 p.m., and is free to the public although donations are appreciated. To reach the Church, travel State Route 4 and turn off on either of the East or West dike roads that parallel Deep River. A journey of a little over a mile will attain the site of what was once the town of Deep River. At that point, continue about a mile up the valley on Deep River Valley Road to find the Church on the right-hand side of the road. Parking is available along the road side or along the entry road to the Deep River Cemetery.

Tickets and maps for the Home Tour are available in Naselle at Mike Swanson Realty as well as The Hair Villa and can also be purchased at Finn Ware in Astoria. They will also be available at the Church as well as each of the homes included in the tour. Tickets are $5 and the money received will be used to support the Finnish-American Folk Festival, a biennial festival held in Naselle on even numbered years.

The Home Tour takes in three homes this year. The Ullakko farmhouse is a perfect example of homes from the early part of the last century and its charm and décor will delight the senses. The farmhouse will be open for tourers from noon to 5:30 p.m. to accommodate those coming from Astoria and the peninsula. The Nikkila home, better known as the Finnish Line, is a more modern story and a half structure that features a room converted into an Old West saloon. Tour guests are invited to pass through the swinging doors and enjoy a sampler mug of sarsaparilla. The Wolf home houses a seldom seen elevator and, in addition, will feature a shop. The Nikkila and Wolf homes will be open for tourers from 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

From 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. a variety of tasty hot soups will be available at the Lutheran Church in Naselle located at 308 Old Knappton Road. The ladies are absolute artists in the making of their soups which are sure to bring “oohs and aahs” from the diners. The soup supper is on a donation basis with all donations going to support the Finnish-American Folk Festival.

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