LONG?BEACH — Ocean Beach School District (OBSD) Superintendent Boyd Keyser accepted a contract that was approved Tuesday, May 31 by the North Marion School Board in Aurora, Ore., to become their school superintendent beginning July 1. 

North Marion serves the communities of Aurora, Broadacres, Butteville, Donald, Hubbard and Woodburn in a rural setting near Salem. Four schools house the total district population of nearly 2,000 students. Keyser’s last day at Ocean Beach School District will be June 30. 

The Ocean Beach school board posted the position in late May and ESD 112 is actively receiving applications from those interested in the position. ESD 112 will screen the applicants and forward their recommendations of the top three or four candidates to the OBSD board along with information about all who applied, according to OBSD board chairman Kim Patten.

A school board meeting is set for June 13 to review ESD 112’s list and then a thorough hiring process will begin. “A list of candidates to interview and a schedule of the interview process, including a community forum, will be released at a later date. It is the hope that the school board will finish the interview process and make a selection by the end of June,” Patten said.

“I have wanted to share the news of my new job offer for over a week now, but thought it prudent to wait until the contract negotiations were complete and the final vote had been taken by the North Marion school board. My move back to Oregon comes with both joy and sadness,” Keyser said June 1. 

  “I have considered it a great privilege to lead such a wonderful district as Ocean Beach. Our schools are filled with incredible people who make a difference in the lives of young people every day and I feel blessed to have had the opportunity to work with you all. I will take with me great memories of a caring and compassionate staff and a supportive community who truly care about their schools and our children,” Keyser said.

  “Knowing about my impending departure, the Ocean Beach school board has already opened the superintendent position and is actively seeking qualified candidates. On Friday, June 3, a board member will be in each of our school buildings to talk about the superintendent search process and to gather input from our teachers and employees,” Keyser explained. 

“I want to thank all of you for your kindness and support to my wife and I during our stay. I will be starting my new job on July 1 so I am sure the next few weeks will fly by. I am hoping to see each of you before I go, but if I can’t catch you before then, please know that I wish you all the best in the days ahead,” Keyser concluded by signing an email as “superintendent, chief steward and learner.” 

Keyser became superintendent on July 1, 2009, taking over from Rainer Houser, who served for four years after a candidate for the position accepted the job in the spring of 2005, only to change his mind days later. Before Houser, Tom Lockyer headed the district from July 2002 to June 2005. Hometown woman Nancey Olson was superintendent from October 1998 until her retirement in 2002. 

According to the National Council of the Professors of Educational Administration, superintendent turnover averaged six to seven years, regardless of the district’s size or location. The research indicated that superintendent tenure had not markedly increased since 1975.

The 2000 AASA survey sampled 2,262 superintendents; average tenure of superintendents was estimated to be between five and six years, slightly lower than the previous survey in 1992.

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